Moran Actually

Welcome

I’ve been talking about this for years and sitting on this particular piece for months.

In my previous, parallel career as a part-time, freelance writer and editor, I didn’t find the ideas for stories difficult, nor the detail.

The most difficult parts are always the beginning and the end. So, when one decides to foist one’s thoughts upon the world – assuming it’s listening – where does one begin?

These writings aim to collate my various experiences, rantings, general thoughts and will borrow heavily from people much cleverer than me. Some of this may be useful to people in business, particularly in Japan; some in learning and publishing. Some of it will be interesting to people with a general interest in Japan. Some of it might be fun. Hopefully there will be the odd chuckle.

I hope to publish regularly. I will be brief and to the point. As an editor, I used to pride myself on my ability to make a poor 1,000-word article into a passable 300-word one.

I am ably assisted in this venture by Gina Torgersen, Editor of All Things at Modern English.

I’ll be touching on technology and different work styles. A friend in the UK has built an IT company of 70 people in a few years, using what they describe as the JFDI approach. Those initials are hopefully self-evident.

In that spirit, I’m just doing this one.

Latest Posts

Running a School: Systems, Part 2

As mentioned last time, it is essential to be able to step outside of your business. This is very difficult to do while still doing every single job in it. We’ve also previously discussed what business you are actually in. You may be running an English school. You may...

read more

Running a School: Systems, Part 1

In recent posts while away on holiday or business, I hinted at having a business that worked for me while I’m not there. To do this, you need systems in place. At a recent school owners’ conference here in Japan, a small, self-employed, teacher-owner-operator recently...

read more

Bio

I grew up in Whitley Bay, Northumberland, in the north east of England. I left in 1992. I travelled in Asia and Australasia, arriving back in England in 1995. I came to Japan later that year.

I’d intended to use ELT as a portable skill to allow me to travel more in Asia. Somehow, I’ve ended up staying here in Japan.

Read More

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Choose newsletters: