Moran Actually https://www.moranactually.com Writings from Japan Tue, 14 Jan 2020 01:36:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 https://www.moranactually.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/favicon.png Moran Actually https://www.moranactually.com 32 32 What I Learned About Business from Being in a Band, Part 6 https://www.moranactually.com/2020/01/13/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band-part-6/ https://www.moranactually.com/2020/01/13/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band-part-6/#respond Mon, 13 Jan 2020 06:22:07 +0000 https://www.moranactually.com/?p=748 We sat excitedly at a table in the Dog and Parrot on Clayton Street in Newcastle upon Tyne, a pub and live venue we’d debuted at some 10 months previously. We were waiting for the A and R man from London Records. This had come about as my guerrilla marketing skills had paid off. Noting […]

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We sat excitedly at a table in the Dog and Parrot on Clayton Street in Newcastle upon Tyne, a pub and live venue we’d debuted at some 10 months previously. We were waiting for the A and R man from London Records.

This had come about as my guerrilla marketing skills had paid off. Noting all of the editors of the local music magazines – and at the time there were four of them in print – were men, I adopted a somewhat enticing-sounding female nom de plume and wrote reviews of our own gigs.

One of these was published in Paint it Red, a very popular magazine at the time.

This resulted in a phone call from the editor, who wanted more content from the fictional Adele Morris, and also one from the A and R department at London Records, who wanted a demo.

We sent off the demo and arranged to meet in the Dog and Parrot.

This was it, we thought. We were on our way. At this point it was twelve years since I first pretended to be in a band, and nine since my friends and I had started taking it seriously.

This was the fourth or fifth real incarnation, and though I’m very obviously biased, we were good.

I was annoyed with the drummer, because he hadn’t worn the shirt I’d asked him to. I wasn’t sure his army shirt – very The Clash – would properly reflect our image.

No matter.

We waited, and waited.

One pint turned into two, and then into three. Over an hour and a half had passed since the allotted time.

We realised the A and R man from London Records wasn’t coming.

A couple of days later I received our demo tape back in the post. It was returned along with a scribbled note on the original cover letter, telling us they weren’t interested but they wished us luck.

At least they returned the tape.

Not long after that, we sacked the vocalist, the drummer left, and the guitarist and I decided to decamp to the Middle East to earn some money and work on our music.

It all sounds rather charming now.

The guitarist departed and, through his connections, quickly set himself up with a job and a flat. To save for the airfare, I got a temporary job as a data input clerk with a frozen food supplier. Doing this, I realised the last thing I wanted to do was to transfer one meaningless job in the dark, damp north-east of England, to another meaningless job in the air-conditioned confines of the United Arab Emirates.

I saw the temporary contract out for its full six months, saved up as much as I could, bought a one-way ticket and left for Australia via Thailand in September 1992. I was 25.

Before starting this miniseries of articles about being in bands, I wrote a list of the skills I use in my business and I advise others to pay attention to.

The ticks below show the only ones that were not used during my time in bands are legal (save the copyright notice on the demo tape) and contracts. We never got one.

Since starting the publishing side of our business, we have sold more books and CDs than we have could have realistically hoped to by being in a band.

Happy Valley and the Double Deckers, our pre-school and general English brands, contain so many influences and transferable skills I learned in bands with my friends.

Very little of the checklist below lists skills taught during my schooling.

In the band, the goal was often unclear, changed often and we learned on the job, as we had to, and we were self-motivated.

This is the way to work.

This is the way to learn.

Intrinsic Motivation✔
Self organisation ✔
Personal/Professional
Mission ✔
Vision Values ✔
Aim ✔
Structure ✔
HR✔
Hiring✔
Firing✔
Equipment ✔
Logistics/operations ✔
Proficiency ✔
Creativity✔
Marketing ✔
Sales ✔
Contracts
Legal
Harmony ✔
Budgets ✔
Filing ✔
Admin ✔
Targets ✔
Goal setting, measuring, refining ✔
SCRUM ✔
Agile  ✔
Pivot ✔
Publish and be damned ✔
Being in your element ✔

 

We now offer a consultancy service with a no-obligation first contact.

If you would like help systemising your business or anything else, please get in touch.

 

 

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Happy New Year https://www.moranactually.com/2019/12/30/happy-new-year/ https://www.moranactually.com/2019/12/30/happy-new-year/#respond Mon, 30 Dec 2019 01:00:38 +0000 https://www.moranactually.com/?p=743 We hope 2020 will turn out to be a fantastic Year of the Rat for everybody; that you will all be scooting about hither and thither in prosperous endeavours. Here at Moran Towers, we’re feeling effects of lounging around doing pretty little for two weeks. From next week, we get back to it.

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We hope 2020 will turn out to be a fantastic Year of the Rat for everybody; that you will all be scooting about hither and thither in prosperous endeavours.

Here at Moran Towers, we’re feeling effects of lounging around doing pretty little for two weeks.

From next week, we get back to it.

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Merry Christmas https://www.moranactually.com/2019/12/23/merry-christmas/ https://www.moranactually.com/2019/12/23/merry-christmas/#respond Mon, 23 Dec 2019 01:00:45 +0000 https://www.moranactually.com/?p=739 Dear All, Many thanks for reading the Moran Actually blog in 2019. Writing it has reminded me of why I do certain things and helped me focus on others for the future. Wherever you are and whatever you do, I hope some of what we’ve written has been of some use. We would like to […]

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Dear All,

Many thanks for reading the Moran Actually blog in 2019.

Writing it has reminded me of why I do certain things and helped me focus on others for the future.

Wherever you are and whatever you do, I hope some of what we’ve written has been of some use.

We would like to wish all the readers of the blog and their families a very merry Christmas and a happy New Year, and if you don’t celebrate the western Christmas, we wish you all the very best of the season.

As always, we look forward to your continued comments and conversation in 2020.

For now, from Osaka, we wish you peace and prosperity.

Simon

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What I Learned About Business from Being in a Band, Part 5 https://www.moranactually.com/2019/12/16/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band-part-5/ https://www.moranactually.com/2019/12/16/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band-part-5/#respond Mon, 16 Dec 2019 01:00:53 +0000 https://www.moranactually.com/?p=736 We developed proficiency individually by practising on our own. We developed proficiency as a unit by practising together. The creative aspect was enhanced by regular song writing sessions by me and the guitarist. As we were getting older, these were often fuelled by cans of beer and glasses of home-brewed cider. We started to look […]

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We developed proficiency individually by practising on our own. We developed proficiency as a unit by practising together. The creative aspect was enhanced by regular song writing sessions by me and the guitarist. As we were getting older, these were often fuelled by cans of beer and glasses of home-brewed cider.

We started to look at more technical aspects like harmony, though in truth never managed to pull it off particularly well, even though we also rehearsed walking home from illicit pints in the pub.

But the gigs were getting bigger and we needed to get our message out.

We had studied nothing about marketing or sales at school, so we copied what people we knew did, and came up with some ruses of our own.

These days it would be called guerrilla marketing. We used to go into the pubs near the venues we were playing and replace the beer mats on the tables with ones advertising our gigs.

We used to fly-post all around town. These were the days of real cut and paste. Somebody would do some artwork and somehow, somewhere, we would use somebody’s photocopier and make posters advertising the gig.

We walked around town, putting posters up illegally, once memorably managing to put one on the side of a passing bus.

A friend who was a DJ played sets between bands – we had other bands we’d play with regularly. He had a knack for marketing and came up with the name Lemonade Hand Grenade Productions.

He decided we should charge 99p for entry. So we made sure we had an old whiskey bottle full of 1p coins to give out change.

There were logistics involved. Not only did we have to transport our gear to rehearsals, but we had to get it to gigs. When the gigs start getting bigger, we needed to hire PAs.

PA hire was handled by local firms and was quite expensive.

We had to work out a budget for each gig. How much were we going to have to pay for equipment hire, how much could we charge on the door? We paid all expenses. The money on the door was ours, the money behind the bar went to the venue.

We never made any money at all, but it really didn’t matter.

Van hire was quite tricky when you were 17 or 18. Most places required that you were 20 or 21. We somehow managed to convince one hire company sometime in 1984 that one of us was 21, hired a van and headed off south through the Tyne Tunnel for our first real ‘away’ gig at a college in Durham. It was a round trip of 54 miles.

This was life on the road.

We had a filing system. We had a big file for all the song lyrics. We carried this to the song writing sessions and used it as a reference in rehearsal. We committed everything to memory to play on stage.

This file also became a repository of our hopes and dreams and I still have it.

I spoke earlier about targets. In the back of one of the exercise books, taken from school, there is a series of targets mapping out that future career of the band.

We only achieved one of them, really, but we got close to a couple of others.

Aside from the musical leadership in the band, the main singer-songwriter, nobody was really in charge. We were a flat-structured, self-organised working environment. We didn’t ask a big question, as you would in a SOLE, but we identified a target, broke the project down and worked on the individual tasks we needed to get there.

Just before the gig in Durham, we’d added a new guitarist and needed to bed him in. We needed to add a new song to the set. None were finished. We needed to work on several of them, select the best, then work on the chorus and the harmonies.

We need to hire a van, organise transport for the fans (our friends), organise beds to sleep in, make sure we had enough money for the pub and make sure we could still stand by the time we got on stage.

We needed to make sure we could deliver.

Sir Ken Robinson talks about finding your element. He notes this as doing something you enjoy with proficiency, and noticing that time goes very fast.

This was what being a band was like for me.

I never had any great proficiency, but I was OK and I loved what we did.

We were self-motivated, self-organised and we were in our element.

All of the motivation and rewards were intrinsic. This meant nothing in our academic or professional careers.

I didn’t realise at the time, but I learned so many transferable skills, all of our own doing, that I have used in business, and in my life since then.

Next time we’ll review them.

 

We now offer a consultancy service with a no-obligation first contact.

If you would like help systemising your business or anything else, please get in touch.

 

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What I Learned About Business from Being in a Band, Part 4 https://www.moranactually.com/2019/12/09/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band-part-4/ https://www.moranactually.com/2019/12/09/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band-part-4/#respond Mon, 09 Dec 2019 01:00:41 +0000 https://www.moranactually.com/?p=732 By 1983, we’d been through several personnel changes and had firmed up as a three-piece. In two years of hanging around, occasionally rehearsing, all the while dreaming, we had dispensed with two bass players, one vocalist and a keyboard player. The original drummer had moved on to guitarist’s brother’s kit, and I had been moved […]

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By 1983, we’d been through several personnel changes and had firmed up as a three-piece.

In two years of hanging around, occasionally rehearsing, all the while dreaming, we had dispensed with two bass players, one vocalist and a keyboard player.

The original drummer had moved on to guitarist’s brother’s kit, and I had been moved onto bass. Perhaps relegated.

We also need to set targets. We worked with the BHAG and the STAG.

The BHAG was easy. We wanted to be big.

But we needed to break the larger goals down into more obvious, smaller, more achievable ones.

We were determined we were going to break out of garage band life – though in fact rehearsals were in the front room at my mum’s after Sunday lunch – and into the world of gigging.

So, we needed a set. We reckoned we needed 10 songs. Not for us the apprenticeship of smoky rooms in Hamburg, playing 1950s rock ‘n’ roll, we were creative and we were going to do all originals.

So, we need a set of ten original songs, and we set about writing.

What He Said was deemed too juvenile, too punk, and we went through a process of writing and refining.

Somebody had an idea, usually the guitarist, and we would work on this. Looking back, the songs often came more or less fully formed, and the guitarist would tell us what to do. He was taking over the leadership of the band, and though not truly comfortable singing, he led us.

We added our parts to his instructions, and things started to come together.

We wondered if we were ready to gig.  There was doubt, but nonetheless we just had to get on and do it.

We wrote and rehearsed regularly on Sundays for over a year until we debuted at the Queens Head in Cullercoats on July 13th, 1984.

From memory, we played a 10-song set, including one cover.

By this time we’d built up a small following – our friends.

We set up in the back room in the pub and did a sound check. Nobody was around.

We were going on in 20 minutes, and contemplating playing our first gig to an empty room when we look towards the station and saw what appeared to us to be a huge crowd walking down the street towards the venue.

We had an audience!

Part terrified, mainly exhilarated, we took to the stage, one end of a very small back room, and ripped through our set at breakneck speed.

People were jumping up and down, dancing, waving their hands in the air and we got an encore. I only remember making one mistake – and it was a huge one, coming in on D instead of A. But we were not bad, we had our first gig under our belts, and we were a band.

We were on our way.

Next time we’ll look at the useful skills we learned and then took forward.

 

We now offer a consultancy service with a no-obligation first contact.

If you would like help systemising your business or anything else, please get in touch.

 

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What I Learned About Business from Being in a Band, Part 3 https://www.moranactually.com/2019/12/02/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band-part-3/ https://www.moranactually.com/2019/12/02/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band-part-3/#respond Mon, 02 Dec 2019 01:00:03 +0000 https://www.moranactually.com/?p=727 Most people are familiar with the format of rock and pop bands. Drums, bass, guitar or two, singer or two, sometimes combined. Sometimes just a three-piece. In the summer of 1981, the first ‘proper’ band I was in spent most days of the summer holidays watching Richard Marquand’s The Birth of the Beatles. We knew […]

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Most people are familiar with the format of rock and pop bands.

Drums, bass, guitar or two, singer or two, sometimes combined.

Sometimes just a three-piece.

In the summer of 1981, the first ‘proper’ band I was in spent most days of the summer holidays watching Richard Marquand’s The Birth of the Beatles.

We knew it line by line, and that was the model we were going to follow.

It’s worth noting that this band talked about being a band more than it actually was a band, but at least we had a drummer with a drum kit, albeit a junior one.

We were thirteen and fourteen.

So, drummer, bassist, guitarist. Just the three of us. That was our structure.

We had no thoughts of a manager or an agent. That would come later.

This early foray into company structure and HR taught me a couple of things. The fewer people you work with, the easier it is to organise a team and get everybody together in one place at one time.

I also learned that people often have different ideas, egos clash, and drummers are often crazy.

This translates very simply and easily into the world of education businesses, another emotive subject; people have strong ideas, and here in Japan, there are often challenging personalities on either side of the whiteboard as people delve into aspects of foreign culture. They are often either inquisitive, adventurous or running away from something.

However, once your structure is in place, you go and fill the roles.

We had the core three, but no recognised channels to recruit the extra member we felt we needed.

Another thing I learned was the usefulness of networking – better known at the time as hanging out with your mates at Churchill Playing Fields – and in this way we met a guitarist who could take us to another level.

He played really well, and at his house, his brother had a better drum kit than ours.

He was in.

The next thing we needed was better equipment.

I had two acoustic guitars: a 3/4-size I’d been given as a present as a kid, and one I bought second-hand from the Evening Chronicle for £8. Neither sufficed.

Handmade Music, the music shop around the corner from my house, which dealt mainly in classical instruments and supplied them to the school, put four electric guitars in their window in 1981.

One of my friends said he was going to get one. From memory, one was priced £40, the other was £50.

I had never for a moment imagined I would own my own electric guitar. They seemed like the stuff of dreams.

The other thing I learned early in my career in bands was about credit.

The average weekly wage at the time was £134 per week and a pint of beer cost 50p (£681 and £3.67 today). There was no way I could afford to buy an electric guitar, my parents weren’t rich enough to just buy me one as a birthday present, and I suspect they also wanted to encourage me to work.

I did two paper rounds, one in the morning, and one on a Sunday, and I had my pocket money. All of this I saved up. I then combined the value of a birthday present and a Christmas present, worked out a re-payment plan to pay the rest off to my mum, and got my first ever electric guitar.

I’d gone electric and learned about getting into debt to fund creative endeavours I hoped would become a business.

The guitar was a Harmony double cutaway, an American-made, mass-produced guitar with two humbucker pickups. Brown. Not a great colour. But a lovely warm sound.

This was the first electric guitar I ever had, and the first one I ever used to write an electric song. We practised on the landing at a friend’s house, and it developed as we went.

I still have the guitar and shipped it over to Japan a few years ago. I played it on GarageBand as I reimagined the first song I ever wrote on it.

Please find it here, and don’t be offended by the last, humorous, in-character line.

I make no apologies for the punk rock spirit, not tuning the guitars properly, doing everything in mono down the middle and multi-tracking the two-note guitar solo. I didn’t quite get the Joe Strummer, White Riot vocal I was aiming for, but at least it’s mercifully short.

Next time we’ll look at setting goals.

 

We now offer a consultancy service with a no-obligation first contact.

If you would like help systemising your business or anything else, please get in touch.

 

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What I Learned About Business from Being in a Band, Part 2 https://www.moranactually.com/2019/11/25/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band-part-2/ https://www.moranactually.com/2019/11/25/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band-part-2/#respond Mon, 25 Nov 2019 01:00:00 +0000 https://www.moranactually.com/?p=724 When working with clients to help them organise their businesses, there are several things we start with. One of these is a personal mission statement, and the other is a mission, vision and values statement for the business. The personal vision statement focuses, of course, on our personal life. What do we want to be […]

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When working with clients to help them organise their businesses, there are several things we start with.

One of these is a personal mission statement, and the other is a mission, vision and values statement for the business.

The personal vision statement focuses, of course, on our personal life. What do we want to be doing on a daily basis, what income will we be reasonably satisfied with, what will this allow us to do, where do we want to live, how often do we wish to take holidays, what are our hopes for our family?

It’s very easy to state things you like and want to do, but perhaps even easier to state those you don’t. Bringing it all together is then the challenge.

Without knowing this, this is what we did when we formed bands. Our personal mission statement went something like this:

I do not ever want a job. I want to be a rock star.

Easy.

Sometimes writing the company mission, vision and values can take a lot of time and much hand-wringing. How do we want to effect change in the world for the better, how will we do it, and which values will we hold ourselves to when trying? What stops us being distracted from our larger aim?

Lots of the bands I was in had a logo and a slogan, and I was always very keen on image and stage clothes, but none ever had an official mission, vision and values statement.

If we had, for the first band I gigged with, back in 1984, it may have run something like this:

We aim to break through the negativity and mediocrity around us,

Through self-motivation, positivity and creativity and,

As a result, we will all be free of our shackles.

Or perhaps not.

We were young, sixteen and seventeen, idealistic and, though optimistic, felt trapped by school and horrified by the thought both of work and long-term unemployment.

We lived in troubled political and economic times. Inflation and unemployment in the U.K. were at post-war highs; there were riots on picket lines at coal mines. I persuaded a teacher at school she shouldn’t give us work to do while she was on strike as it would negate her point.

But form we did, around our shared values, and our teenage political angst shone through later in our lyrics.

But I digress. First, we had to get organised. More on that next time.

 

We now offer a consultancy service with a no-obligation first contact.

If you would like help systemising your business or anything else, please get in touch.

 

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What I Learned About Business from Being in a Band https://www.moranactually.com/2019/11/18/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band/ https://www.moranactually.com/2019/11/18/what-i-learned-about-business-from-being-in-a-band/#respond Mon, 18 Nov 2019 01:00:26 +0000 https://www.moranactually.com/?p=715 We’ve talked previously about self-organised learning environments (SOLEs). In future posts we’ll also discuss self-organised working environments (SOWEs). Being in a band, without me knowing it, involved me in both. As previously discussed in the blog, a school business, like any other, needs leadership, structure, organisation, identifiable roles and responsibilities, and systems, not to mention […]

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We’ve talked previously about self-organised learning environments (SOLEs). In future posts we’ll also discuss self-organised working environments (SOWEs). Being in a band, without me knowing it, involved me in both.

As previously discussed in the blog, a school business, like any other, needs leadership, structure, organisation, identifiable roles and responsibilities, and systems, not to mention a killer product, a way to deliver, marketing, lead generation, sales and CRM. All of this will hopefully generate a loyal following.

This loyal following is often referred to as having raving fans.

I’m not sure any of the bands I’ve been in ever had a killer product, nor any raving fans, but we certainly generated a following, of a kind, and produced original material.

The first band I was in was in middle school, when I was 11 or 12 years old.

A boy in my year decided he wanted to form a band and enlisted another three of us to join. Why he chose us, I don’t know, but it seemed like a good idea, so, under his leadership, we formed, had a drummer, two guitarists and him. It was never really clear what he was going to do, but that didn’t really matter.

He somehow managed to arrange a place to rehearse and a drum kit. I think we made it through two rehearsals before it petered out, without ever really achieving much. This was largely because we didn’t have a clue what we were doing, or what we wanted to do.

None of that mattered, either, because a seed had been sown and later, in other bands with other people, we had clear ideas of what we wanted to achieve, found out what we needed to know, how to implement it and move forward, all under our own steam.

We’ll look at the what and the how, and the results, in the next few articles.

 

We now offer a consultancy service with a no-obligation first contact.

If you would like help systemising your business or anything else, please get in touch.

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Euro Zone https://www.moranactually.com/2019/11/11/euro-zone/ https://www.moranactually.com/2019/11/11/euro-zone/#respond Mon, 11 Nov 2019 01:00:52 +0000 https://www.moranactually.com/?p=676 The post Euro Zone appeared first on Moran Actually.

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We have been on our travels again.

October saw us in Frankfurt, for the Book Fair, promoting our materials, working with friends and making new ones. It’s always a fun time, but the spaces in the aisles hint at changes in the distribution of print.

From there we flew home, and still get excited as the plane from Amsterdam heads out to sea and does a big left turn around Saint Mary’s Island, where I used to fish as a child.

The old and familiar are still there where I grew up, but I ripped part of it down, and built a new garden shed.

Change is the only constant. The new replaces the old.

We will be making some other announcements of this kind soon.

I visited Scotland and the Edinburgh school we have a share in.

A British Council accredited school, it has very strict safeguarding rules.

In fact, I learned on several short journeys, a UK taxi driver has to go through a more thorough background check than a teacher of children in Japan. It’s an off-kilter, odd world.

I also met family, lots of old school friends and my old bandmates.

Oh, what could have been.

In an oddity of travel and placement, we then flew home again.

Next week we begin the series What I Learned About Business from Being in a Band.

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What I Learned About Business from Going to School, Part 6 https://www.moranactually.com/2019/10/14/669/ https://www.moranactually.com/2019/10/14/669/#respond Mon, 14 Oct 2019 01:00:33 +0000 https://www.moranactually.com/?p=669 As I write this article, one Sam Fender, of North Shields in the north-east of England, is number one in the album charts in the UK. Sam went to a high school in my hometown, then joined the sixth form at my old high school. He has talked about how a teacher at his high […]

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As I write this article, one Sam Fender, of North Shields in the north-east of England, is number one in the album charts in the UK.

Sam went to a high school in my hometown, then joined the sixth form at my old high school.

He has talked about how a teacher at his high school (not the sixth form) helped him work on his writing.

He’s also talked about his dad being in a band and his brother being a drummer, and how this helped him become a musician and ultimately win a Brit Award and top the charts in the UK.

Not only am I immensely proud of Sam because he’s a young Geordie lad who went to my school, but his album is also brilliant. He talks about social issues relevant to an early twenty-something man from North Shields: male suicide, mental health, unemployment, benefits assessment, drinking culture, assumed white privilege.

He said he left sixth form with terrible grades and didn’t know what to do. (This is the only thing Sam and I have in common.)

On benefits, he worked in a pub, got his lucky break and gigged hard for five years before topping the charts.

At school I was also in a band. I was in a few of them. None of this was encouraged by the school. In fact, one year, we approached the head of my house and asked if we could perform rock Christmas songs at the annual house Christmas assembly.

To his credit, the house head was all for the idea. He asked us to leave it with him; so we did.

He came back to us later and the answer was no. The reasons? Well, it didn’t quite fit in with the plan. Not only were we different ages and in different school years – we straddled an enormous two academic years – we were also in different houses.

There were four houses at my school: Warkworth (my house), Alnwick, Bamburgh and Dunstanburgh, named after the four principal castles in Northumberland.

The guitarist was also in Warkworth, but the drummer was in Bamburgh and the bassist in Dunstanburgh (I hadn’t yet been relegated to the bass) and this was just impossible to overcome, it seemed.

This was the second time we’d been knocked back from trying to get a band project working in school. No matter how we tried, we didn’t seem to be able to get our fun life outside of school to fit into the dull life inside it.

I’ve no doubt this would be encouraged now, and credit to those that let that happen.

So what did I learn from this? I basically learned to stick two fingers up at them all and to get on with it and do it on my own.

We’re off to the Frankfurt Book Fair, and to visit family in the UK.

Normal service will be resumed in a couple of weeks, with the first in the new series of articles: What I Learned About Business from Being in a Band.

Till then, gan canny and check out the fantastic Sam Fender and his brilliant album, Hypersonic Missiles.

 

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